History of the Southwest Coastal Area Local

The history of our local is very important.  These were our local Presidents, and all worked full time for the union:

  1. John Gaffney from Orange Post Office 1973-1977 (Two-Year Term)
  2. Peter Katz from Newport Beach 1977-1979 (Two-Year Term)
  3. Bonnie Nelson from Huntington Beach 1979-1987 (One two-year Term and two three-year terms)
  4. Bobby Donelson from Santa Ana 1987 -1990 (One three-year term and a second 1-day term)
  5. Ralph Lefter from Santa Ana 1990-1996 (Two three-year term)
  6. Richard Cantu from Santa Ana 1996-1999 (One three-year term)
  7. Ralph Lefter from Santa Ana 1199-2005 (Two three-year term)
  8. James Chaing from Santa Ana 2005-2005 (Seven-Month term)
  9. Bobby Donelson from Santa Ana 2005-2011 (Three& half year term and a three-year term)
  10. Richard Cantu from Santa Ana 2011-2017 ((Two three-year term)
  11. Phil Khong from Santa Ana 2017-? Current president

Our local has been very active through the year with the Orange County Labor Council now the Orange County Labor Federation, the California State APWU organization and the regional and national union.

Members of our local have also served in other union capacities.

Matt Ogorek – APWU Hospital Plan Representative (appointed position)

Bobby Donelson – Western Region Maintenance NBA, National Maintenance Representative at Large, and National Assistant “A” Maintenance Director.  In addition, Bobby also served as a SCF Representative for the California State APWU.

Lenny Trujillo – San Francisco Region Clerk NBA.

Bruce Bailey – Western Region MVS NBA and California State MVS Director.

Richard Shepard – – Western Region Maintenance NBA and California State Maintenance NBA.

Mike Stinson, Frank Townsend, Richard Cantu, Walter Lovett, Kevin Cole, Bonnie Nelson, Isabelle Bailey, Bruce Bailey, Bobby Donelson, Richard Shepard, and Roosevelt Smith all have served as delegates to the Orange County Labor Council now the Orange County Labor Federation.

Bobby Donelson served National Rank and File Bargaining Committee two different time.

Bonnie Nelson, Ralph Lefter, Richard Cantu, and Bobby Donelson served the National Convention Constitution Committee.

This little bit of history is so our newer officers and members can know something about our local union.  I sincerely hope I did not miss anyone.

I was honored to serve at two different times as your local president and had two long time Southwest Coastal Area Local members working with me – Frank Townsend and Mike Stinson, as well as the support of the Southwest Coastal Area Local Executive Board.

One local accomplishment when Frank Townsend, Mike Stinson, and I along with the 2005-2011 Executive Board Members obtained was to purchase a local union office for our members without carrying a mortgage payment.

This has saved the local thousands and thousands of dollars over the year.

The membership in the Southwest Coastal Area Local increased to our peak of approximately 2300 members and then excessing, abolishment, early retirement, and automation caused our local to decrease to its current level of approximately 1400 members.

The Southwest Coastal Area Local was 45 years old on August 1, 2018.  We were formed as an area local in 1973.  Prior to that time each Postal Installation was a separate local union.

The Southwest Coastal Area Local Retiree Chapter will be 14 years old on Monday, September 10, 2018.

The history of our local is very important

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Donelson bd62748@aol.com 2045 So. June Place Anaheim, CA 92802 Phone: 714 750-3656 Cell: 714 206-2931 Postal Reorganization Act -Public Law 91-375 – August 12, 1970 Southwest Coastal Area Local Chartered – August 1, 1973 Southwest Coastal Area Local Retiree Chapter Chartered – September 10, 2004

“We are not the Enemy”

https://swcalretirees.org/

Reply Reply to All Forward More

Click to reply all
An error occurred while uploading.Dismiss

Send

Attach Files Trouble uploading? Try our Basic Uploader.

 

Press Esc or click anywhere to return to Mail.

Retiree Information

Brothers and Sisters:
There is no way the Retiree Department should be shrinking.  However, do the comments from some national officers and local presidents this what is happening.  In formation came from the National APWU’s LM 2 for 2013-2017.
2013 – 40,583 Retired Members
2014 – 39,721 Retired Members
2015 – 39,504 Retired Members
2016 – 38,908 Retired Members
2017 – 38,285 Retired Members
The constant attack on Retiree Issues at the National Convention does not serve the Retiree Members, Retiree Department, or Retiree Director.  Those close to retirement age are retiring but not joining the department.
We have far too many local union members (not all) who fear retirees and national officers (not all) who fear retirees.  They want to use retirees to support the union’s positions and provide “cheap labor” to do the work. 
The top three officers of the APWU have said retirees are important, yet fail to say the same in front of the convention.
The current philosophy to be seen but not hear must change.
Currently the retirees are a cash cow for the national union.  The retiree department after all expenses netted the APWU $2.408 million  for accounting periods 2016 and 2017, $2.419 million from 2014 and 2015, and  $2.459 million from 2013 and 2014.  This information is from the Convention Finance Committee Report.
What is not mentioned is the millions of dollars the retirees generate for the Health Plan fee that the union received which exceeded $21 millions dollars in 2016/2017.
Currently retirees’ years of service are not appreciated or respected.  
I predict if the APWU does not change its ways toward retirees’ membership in the Retiree Department will continue to decrease.  This truly a shame.
Eastern Regional Coordinator Mike Gallagher and Southwest Coastal Area Local Maintenance Director Will Khong comments at the 2018 National APWU Convention were hurtful and were an insult to retirees.
Retirees do belong at the APWU National Convention and deserve the right to speak on issues and vote for the issues.  The convention is not just for negotiated or collective bargaining issues.  If that was the case, then why did the APWU spend so much money on legislative issues and COPA.
Retirees want to stay involved

 “We are not the Enemy”
This is a message from a retiree:  As I expressed before this is not going to happen unless the higher officers of our National Union support the retirees. it will have a domino effect when leadership supports retirees until then we’re just the back roll trying to get the attention of the people on the platform. It starts with local presidents who support the retirees and not make excuses why they don’t. most retirees have a heart and a passion for the union because they loved it they have been union members their whole career some people once they leave and retire don’t look back and just keep going forward that’s the sadness that those are the ones that don’t support the retirees well they are active members. I’m going to continue to hold you up in prayer to give you strength and that all of us keep that Faith and Hope is this Union we love that will eventually allow retirees in to participate as requested.


Bobby Donelson
bd62748@aol.com
2045 So. June Place
Anaheim, CA 92802
Phone: 714 750-3656
Cell: 714 206-2931
Postal Reorganization Act -Public Law 91-375 – August 12, 1970
Southwest Coastal Area Local Chartered – August 1, 1973
Southwest Coastal Area Local Retiree Chapter Chartered – September 10, 200
4
“We are not the Enemy”
https://swcalretirees.org/

All locals should affiliate with their local labor federation and their state labor federation

All locals should affiliate  with their local labor federation and their state labor federation and most of all pay per capita on all members not a portion.

From:  APWU WEB Page – The Importance of AFL-CIO Federation Affiliation

Affiliating with the AFL-CIO state federations and AFL-CIO Central Labor Councils isn’t just the right thing to do — it is essential in our fight to save the United States Postal Service and to protect our jobs. 

Affiliation gives local leaders and members an opportunity to meet and interact with labor allies.  Wherever our members live and work, each APWU affiliate needs to be an active participant — a real member — of the AFL-CIO local labor councils and state federations.

The APWU National Executive Board shows our support for the labor movement by fully participating with the AFL-CIO in Washington DC and by encouraging support for state federations and CLCs.

The APWU currently pays national “per capita dues” for 100 percent of our members to the national AFL-CIO. And in an effort to help more APWU locals and states to affiliate with state federations, as well as ease the financial burden, the NEB unanimously passed a resolution at the 18th Biennial National Convention that reads: The National APWU will refund to APWU affiliates 50 percent of the per capita tax paid to a state AFL-CIO Federation by all APWU affiliates that are affiliated with their AFL-CIO State Federation. [Click here to download the State Federation Dues Rebate Request Instructions and Form – PDF]    

http://www.apwu.org/sites/apwu/files/resource-files/AFL- IO%20Affiliation%20Rebate%20Form%2Cpdf.pdf

For more information and to become a member of your state federation or Central Labor Council, call the AFL-CIO Office of State and Local Affiliates at 202-637-5280, or complete an Application for Affiliation PDF]    http://www.apwu.org/sites/apwu/files/resource-files/afl-cio-stateandlocalaff-affilform.pdf and submit it to your state federation or Central Labor Council.

Together we can make a difference and provide a better future for labor in this country.

What are State Federations?

AFL-CIO state federations bring various unions together at the state level to work collectively on organizing new members, education, mobilizing current members, creating a powerful voice for working families.  State federations make up the backbone of the labor movement’s efforts to ensure that economic, education, health care and other policies benefit working families.

What do they do?

State labor federations give working families a voice:

·        On the job.   Working together through “state feds,” local unions support one another’s organizing campaigns and contract bargaining.  Coordinating with a network of local labor councils located in communities throughout each state, state feds turn out large groups of working people to support union members and challenge anti-union, anti-worker employers.  State feds forge alliances that build statewide support for union members’ efforts to win positive changes on the job and retain past gains.

·        In state and federal political campaigns.  State feds endorse candidates for state and federal office, and coordinate the union movement’s statewide political mobilization efforts, including voter registration, worksite leafleting, and neighborhood canvassing.

·        In state and federal government.  State feds provide working families with the information and opportunities they need to make their voices heard by state legislators and by members of Congress.  State feds engage union members in developing and promoting an agenda for good, secure jobs; job safety, adequate investments in such working family needs as education, health care, and retirement security; and against job-killing proposals like privatization of government services.

·        In the economy.  State feds give working families greater power to shape their economic well-being by mobilizing working people for social and economic justice, for fair treatment on the job, and for pro-worker government policies.  They also link local unions with the educational resources of the AFL-CIO, giving members the opportunity to learn more about today’s economy, why it favors the wealthy over working people – and what they can do about it.

How are they structured?

More than 30,000 local unions make up the 51 state federations (including Puerto Rico). While participation by locals in the semi-autonomous organizations chartered by the AFL-CIO is voluntary, the national labor federation strongly encourages all unions to build stronger state labor movements through full affiliation and participation.

State labor federations are comprised of local union unions and other eligible subordinate bodies of the national and international unions that are affiliated with the AFL-CIO.  Certain eligible unions may affiliate by receiving a charter through the Solidarity Charter Program.  Other unions may receive a certificate of affiliation as a direct local affiliate through the Unity Partnerships Program, and local associations of the National Education Association may join by receiving a certificate of affiliation through the AFL-CIO/NEA Labor Solidarity Partnerships.

Representatives of state federations serve on a national advisory committee appointed by the AFL-CIO president.  The State Federation and Central Labor Council Advisory Committee meets twice a year to consider and recommend initiatives and programs to the federation.  State federations are governed by elected, full-time executive officers and executive boards representing affiliated local unions.

What are Central Labor Councils?

AFL-CIO central labor councils bring different unions together in communities to work collectively on organizing new members, educating and mobilizing current members, and creating a powerful voice for working families.  CLCs comprise the grassroots network of the labor movement’s effort to ensure that economic, education, health care and other policies benefit working families.

What do they do?

Central labor councils give working families a voice:

·        On the job.   Working together through CLCs, local unions support one another’s organizing campaigns and contract bargaining.  With “Street Heat” rapid-response teams, CLCs turn out large groups of working people to support union members and challenge anti-union, anti-worker employers.  CLCs forge community alliances that build support for union members’ efforts to win positive charges on the job and retain past gains.

·        In local and state politics.  CLCs endorse candidates for local office, make recommendations on state legislative candidate endorsements, and coordinate the local union movement’s political mobilization efforts, including voter registration, worksite leafleting, and neighborhood canvassing.

·        In local and state government.  CLCs provide working families with the information and opportunities they need to make their voices heard by local elected leaders and state legislators.  CLCs engage union members in developing and promoting an agenda for good, secure jobs; job safety; adequate investments in such working family needs as education, health care, retirement security; and against job-killing proposals like the privatization of government services.

·        In their communities.  An extensive network of community services staffers and volunteers works through CLCs to help union members in need of emergency assistance during family crises and natural disasters, plant closings and economic hardships.  CLCs strengthen communities in additional ways by linking labor with community and religious groups to tackle shared concerns, like supporting high-road economic developments that create good-paying jobs and ensuring an adequate local revenue base for essential services such as education.

·        In the economy.  CLCs give working families greater power to shape their economic well-being by mobilizing working people for social and economic justice, for fair treatment on the job and for pro-worker government policies. CLCs also link local unions with the educational resources of the AFL-CIO, giving members the opportunity to learn more about today’s economy, why it favors the wealthy over working people — and what they can do about it.

How are they structured?

More than 30,000 local unions make up the 525 local labor councils across the nation. While participation by locals in the semi-autonomous organizations chartered by the AFL-CIO is voluntary, the federation strongly encourages all unions to build stronger local labor movements through full affiliation and participation.

Local labor federations are comprised of local unions and other eligible subordinate bodies of the national and international unions that are affiliated with the AFL-CIO. Certain eligible unions may affiliate by receiving a charter through the Solidarity Charter Program. Other unions may receive a certificate of affiliation as a direct local affiliate through the Unity Partnerships Program, and local associations of the National Education Association may join by receiving a certificate of affiliation through the AFL-CIO/NEA Labor Solidarity Partnership.

Representatives of central labor councils serve on a national advisory committee appointed by the AFL-CIO president. The State Federation and Central Labor Council Advisory Committee meets twice a year to consider and recommend initiatives and programs to the federation.  CLCs are governed by elected executive boards, with officers serving part-time or as volunteers in most small and medium-size communities. In larger cities, CLCs have full-time officers and staff.

 

House resolution introduced on USPS privatization

This came from the letter carriers

News & information

July 16, 2018

House resolution introduced on USPS privatization

Today, a group of 10 bipartisan representatives introduced a House Resolution (H. Res. 993) calling on Congress to take all appropriate measures to ensure that the Postal Service remain an independent agency of the federal government and not be subject to privatization.

The bipartisan resolution was introduced by Reps. Rodney Davis (R-IL) and Stephen Lynch (D-MA). Other original cosponsors will be Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA), Paul Cook (R-CA), Brian Mast (R-FL), Don Young (R-AK), Cedric Richmond (D-LA), Stephanie Murphy (D-FL), Dave Loebsack (D-IA) and Marcia Fudge (D-OH).

The resolution’s introduction comes in response to the recent Office of Management and Budget (OMB) government reorganization and restructure plan titled “Delivery Government Solutions in the 21st Century.” While the report takes direct aim at numerous agencies, it calls for privatizing the Postal Service.

“NALC commends our bipartisan friends in Congress for their immediate action to push back against this ill-conceived idea that will adversely impact the constituents they represent and the letter carriers who serve them seven-days-a-week,” said NALC President Rolando.

“Privatization of the Postal Service will inevitably increase costs and limit service for locations not deemed profitable, which is just the tip of the iceberg. Privatization will also threaten the standard of living of letter carriers and all postal employees.” continued Rolando.

“Just as NALC laid out for the White House Postal Task Force, we believe that sensible financial reforms are the way forward –  not burning down the barn at the behest of private shippers.” Rolando said. “We encourage all members of Congress to cosponsor this important bipartisan resolution and oppose any effort to privatize this public institution based in the Constitution.”

NALC encourages all letter carriers to contact their members of Congress to become cosponsors on this resolution.

HRes993

July Retiree Meeting

Meeting will be Saturday, July 28, 2018 at 2:00PM at the local union office located at 1251 N. Tustin Avenue, Anaheim, CA 92807.

The Southwest Coastal Area Local (SWCAL) will be meeting two times this week – SWCAL Executive Board meets at 6 PM on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 and the SWCAL General Membership Meeting is at 4 PM on Saturday July 28, 2018.

The SWCAL Retiree Chapter meets at 2 PM on Saturday, July 28, 2018.

All meetings are at the local union office – 1251 N. Tustin Avenue, Anaheim, CA 92807.

 

Those with Hearing Related Issues – Information from California State Retiree Convention

Santa Ana Service Center

Santa Ana CTAP Service Center
2677 North Main Street, Suite 130
Santa Ana, CA 92705

Hours: 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM, Monday – Friday, except holidays.

To better serve you, please arrive by 4:45 PM.

The Main Street Town Center is a tall white building with blue windows. It is located on the corner of North Main Street and Memory Lane and is across from Polly’s Café & Bakery near the Main Place Mall.

Citibank is the main sign on the building.
Enter the lobby, go down the hall, the Service Center is on your left.

About CTAP

http://www.californiaphones.org/Devices-for-Difficulty-Hearing

CTAP is a program of the California Public Utilities Commission Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Program.

The program is funded by a small surcharge that appears on all telephone bills in California. This surcharge appears on your phone bill as “CA Relay Service and Communications Devices Fund.”

The California Public Utilities Commission administers CTAP, as well as the California Relay Service, under the umbrella of the Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Program.

For more information, please visit www.ddtp.org

About California Phones

Every day, specialized California Phones from the California Telephone Access Program (CTAP) enable over half a million Californians to stay connected.

There’s a California Phone for every need. For example, there are amplified phones that make it easier to hear conversations. Big button phones that are easier to dial. Phones with lights that flash for incoming calls. Convenient portable phones – and more. We also offer phones that are specially designed for individuals with more significant disabilities.

California Phones are available to persons who live in California, have telephone service* and your doctor approves your need. In addition to your doctor, any of the following may certify your need and sign the application form for you:

  • Licensed Medical Doctor (MD)
  • Licensed Speech-Language Pathologist
  • Licensed Physician Assistant
  • Licensed Audiologist
  • Licensed Hearing Aid Dispenser
  • Licensed Optometrist
  • Department of Rehabilitation Counselor
  • Superintendent/Audiologist from the California School for the Deaf Fremont/Riverside

Click HERE to find a Certifying Agent near you.

*Equipment connects to your existing telephone service. Your current telephone service charges still apply, however, the Free Specialized Telephone does not increase your service costs.

About California Relay Service (CRS)

In California, relay service is provided through Hamilton Relay. The CRS Provider page gives more information and customer service numbers. California Relay Service (CRS) Click here for more CRS information.

 

Updated Information

National APWU Convention

The National APWU Convention will be held in Pittsburgh, PA from August 20-24, 2018.  Retirees have are asking for support for two resolutions, one for submission of resolutions (has been resolved) and the right to speak and vote during the National APWU Convention as a retiree.

The right to speak and vote is important to many retirees who remain active in the APWU.  Please ask your local leaders and convention delegates to support the resolution.

Resolved, to amend the APWU Constitution & By-Laws; Article 6: SEC 6. Retiree delegates will be seated with a voice and a vote at the National Convention pursuant to the formula in Article 6, section one.  In addition, renumber current Article 6 section 6 as section 7.

 2018 OPM Open Season for FEHBP

Monday November 12, 2018 – Monday December 10, 2018.

Each year, Open Season runs from the Monday of the second full workweek in November through the Monday of the second full workweek in December.

This provides anyone enrolled in an OPM Health Plan (FEHBP) the opportunity to change health plans.

November 2018 Elections 

Federal, State, County, and City will take place this November 6, 2018.  Please vote because congressional representative can affect retirees in so many ways.  We need to elected congressional leaders who are supportive of retirees.

County, state, and city elected officials are very important as well and can affect our daily life as well.

I vote by mail and encourage anyone eligible to vote by mail to do so.  I enjoy sitting at the table completing my ballot.

Cost of Living (COLA) Increases for retirees.

If inflation continues in the same direction the expected COLA will exceed 2.5% for Social Security and Civil Service Annuitants.

FERS Annuitants COLA increases are:  If the CSRS COLA is more than 3%, the FERS COLA is 1% less, if the CSRS COLA is more than 2% but less than 3%, then the FERS COLA is 2%, and if the CSRS COLA is less than 2%, then the FERS COLA is the same.

Exact COLA will not be known until October of 2018.

Medicare Part B premiums will probably increase if we get a COLA increase